Audio Slide Show: War Games in America

Posted: October 14th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Audio Slideshows, Photography | | No Comments »

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American Snapshots Vol. #1

Posted: June 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Photography | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Inspired by Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliott Erwitt, Peter Turnley and others, I decided to comb through more than 90,000 digital images that I have taken over the last 10 years to make this short book of images.

Despite taking lots of pictures over the years, I think I am just beginning to take the sorts of images I seek. I have much more hard work ahead, but I hope my best images are still out there somewhere—hidden in the back of an old western bar, around the hoopla of a rodeo, within the gates of an abandoned factory or by the pump of a lonely gas station off the interstate.

In the end, taking a good picture is a quest that you never quite finish.

I will also never forget a lesson my friend Peter Turnley learned while sipping wine at La Tartine in Paris with photographer Edouard Boubat.

“Peter,” Boubat said, “if you keep your heart and your eyes open, there is a gift waiting for you at the corner of every street.

AMERICAN SNAPSHOTS by Evan McGlinn | Make Your Own Book
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iPad News Alert: See The World’s First Interactive Magazine Story

Posted: March 19th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Magazines, Technology | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Many thanks to Vincent Laforet for sending me his email with the story about VIV Magazine’s amazing interactive magazine story that they produced for the iPad. As a journalist, I can tell you I think this is the most exciting thing I have seen recently and it really paves the way for innovation and content creation going forward. I agree with Vincent that many magazines will initially balk at the high production costs, but then again, take a look at what Vanity Fair spends on Annie Leibovitz, A-list authors and other editorial expenses. When I worked at Forbes we had more than 85 people on the masthead as I recall. Now it is a tiny fraction of that. Perhaps if magazines get their act together and start embracing this technology, they can hire back all the writers they have purged over the last several years along with a new crew of techies to build and produce this stuff. One thing is certain, the technology is here to stay. Publishers who ignore it, do so at their own peril.


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Apple’s Future? Landmark Image Recognition?

Posted: March 16th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Technology, Travel | Tags: , , | No Comments »

U.S. Patent & Trade Office sketch of Apple patent for a head-mounted display.

With the iPad debut right around the corner, it is interesting to note that today’s New York Times had a small piece in its Bits Blog about Apple hiring Richard DeVaul who is an MIT grad and an expert in the field of “wearable computing.” An excellent article on him can be found from this 2003 article in USA Today.

What this means for Apple going forward is anyone’s guess as the Bits Blog mentions, but obviously big things are in store down the road. Whatever it is – iEyeball or iRetinaTV – I just hope no one wears it while driving.

My hope? One idea would be to link the wearable Apple device to something like Google Goggles whereby you could walk around any city in the world, look at something, and the information about a museum painting, storefront or restaurant menu would pop up instantly in front of you. So long guidebooks…

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PDN: The Top 30 Young Photographers Today

Posted: March 4th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: , | No Comments »

Photo District News – the trade bible for the photo industry – has just released its annual list of the top 30 young photographers. This from the intro on their website…

“Look at the photographers in this year’s PDN’s 30 class and you’ll find a solid refutation of the idea that “everyone is a photographer now.” Did “everyone” move to Beijing to freelance for the AP with no financial guarantee like Danfung Dennis? Or live out of a mini-van so they could create a major project like Scott Conarroe? Or defy social norms to become one of the only female photojournalists from Gaza like Eman Mohammed? Is “everyone” willing to be as patient as Alex Prager, who put on her own shows when gallerists ignored her? Does “everyone” have 2,250 followers on Flickr like Ben Roberts?”

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A Fine New Jersey Whine

Posted: March 2nd, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Ideas, Social Media, Wine | Tags: , , | No Comments »

Never heard of Gary Vaynerchuk? He is a god, and he’s from New Jersey no less. Oh, he knows wine too. Chateau Latour? No Prob. Margeaux? Ditto. CAA reps him. Watch his speech – a great example how being focused in a niche business/topic on the web can reap big rewards. Luv ya Gary. Go Jets!

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Tools: The Wacom Bamboo

Posted: February 20th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Technology | Tags: , | No Comments »

In this ad from YouTube, Wacom shows off its line of Bamboo tablets which were introduced back in September. It’s a very cool tool for lovers of the iPhone and iTouch who like the intuitive multi-touch hand gestures to help you navigate around your desktop.

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World’s Best Chow-Dah?

Posted: February 20th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: New England | Tags: , | No Comments »

B&G's New England Clam Chowder

If you have ever been to Boston, chances are you have eaten at the Union Oyster House. A great spot, but a bit of a tourist trap these days and the place has lost a lot of that old-world charm (“Alexander Hamilton dined here…”) ever since they expanded the place years ago. Their New England clam chowder is ok, but frankly, there is no place better than B&G Oysters in the South End.

What’s the secret of B&G’s chowder? Potato puree. It makes the soup a whole lot lighter than the usual wallop of heavy cream than most restaurants add.

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Landscapes: No Tripod Required

Posted: February 20th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: | No Comments »

One of the most visually exciting things I have seen recently in photography were the images in this article on the Luminous Landscape by Scottish photographers Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson. Instead of capturing images using a tripod to keep the camera steady, they hand-hold the camera and shake it to create more of a painterly effect.

The picture above was one I snapped quickly in my backyard to test their technique – not great but a nice start. The effects are really wonderful and change dramatically depending on how you move the camera. The trick is to use the lowest ISO setting (50) on your camera and shut down the aperature to F22 or more in order to get slow shutter speeds in bright light.

I am planning on doing an entire series of them in the coming weeks. What a relief to be able to leave my tripod at home.

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Interior Design for Small Spaces

Posted: February 11th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Interiors | Tags: , | No Comments »

Random nic nacs on my office bookcase.

For some odd reason I love small rooms and apartments. One of the best small apartments I ever saw belonged to my good friend Todd Romano, the NYC interior designer. His Upper East Side flat was tiny, but had all the style and grace of Versailles.

Today’s article in The New York Times highlights the possibilities one can achieve in a small space.  The article is about Zach Motl, 25, who “has made the most of this studio apartment in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, which he rents for $944 a month, and has outfitted for about $2,500 in the three years since he moved to New York City,” says the Times piece. “He has hewed to the old decorating dictum that says the more stuff you put in a room (albeit artfully arranged stuff), the bigger it seems. More really is more.”

Not bad for 178 square feet.

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