Photographing The Port of Seattle

Posted: March 23rd, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Photography, Seattle | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

A photo taken from a bridge heading to West Seattle showing al he infastructure of cranes and shipping containers in he port of Seattle.

Seattle, WA., March 12, 2015: The Port of Seattle. Shell Oil has signed a lease which would allow it to winter-over its Arctic drilling equipment here. That is causing a lot of controversy with everyone from the mayor to an upcoming court battle. Photograph by Evan McGlinn for The New York Times.

The National desk of The New York Times called me the other day with what appeared to be a very simple assignment. They wanted me to spend the day photographing the port of Seattle for an article on Shell Oil storing their Arctic drilling gear in the port. At first blush it appeared to be a simple landscape, but once I drove around the complicated nexus of freeways, freight train tracks and overpasses it quickly occurred to me that this was going to no cakewalk.

After getting lost several times and getting stuck behind freight trains, I drove over to West Seattle and photographed from Jack Block Park and made a terrible photograph. All the infrastructure of the port was too far away. Even with a telephoto lens like the Canon 70-200 it was not a very compelling image. I then drove to Kinnear Park in the Queen Anne section of Seattle. The view of Seattle from here was stunning but the port was still too far away.

Then I got an idea. Weeks before, I had driven over to West Seattle and marveled at the view that I got of the port. Could I possibly park my car on the West Seattle Bridge? Not really. The shoulder is very narrow. But I have always loved shooting from cars so…I put my camera on ISO 640 and a shutter speed of 2500/sec and an aperture of F13 and then drove over the bridge four times holding my camera high out the passenger window as best I could in hopes that I could capture the amazing infrastructure the port. In the end, I was able to capture this image after doing some straightening in Lightroom.

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Seattle Streets – iPhone To The Rescue

Posted: October 24th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Photography, Seattle | Tags: , , | No Comments »

I have to admit I am not a big fan of taking pictures with an iPhone. In general it is too slow and the quality is not great. Then again, I am reminded that some of my favorite photographs from Peter Turnley Cartier Bresson, Eugene Smith and others, are not technically perfect either – but they are great images nonetheless! I spotted this scene out of the corner of my eye the other day while walking along 15th St. in Seattle and quickly snapped it with my iPhone 4 and processed it with Silver eFex Pro. I have to say, it is one of my favorite pictures that I have taken since I moved here 2 months ago. The old saying – “the best camera is the one that is with you” – is indeed true.

An odd assortment of people on the corner of 15th Street in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle.

People on 15th Street in Seattle.

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The Boston Marathon Bombings

Posted: May 9th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: | No Comments »

I woke up last Saturday pleasantly surprised to find my picture of Katherine Russell – the wife of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev – on the front page of The New York Times. It goes to show why I never delete a photo. I didn’t know who she was at this point in the story when she appeared briefly at 410 Norfolk Street in Cambridge, the day after the FBI and others searched the house for explosives. It wasn’t until I photographed a mosque in Dorchester for a profile of her that I realized it was her that day. I Googled the mosque to learn more about it for a caption and saw an image of her image from that day in a photo from Newsday – I am in the background just after this picture was taken. Remember the photo of Monica Lewinsky kissing Bill Clonton. That photo has a similar story.

 

Katherine Russell Tsarnaev flees a house at 410 Norfolk Street in Cambridge the day after it was searched by The FBI looking for explosives and other evidence in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Katherine Russell Tsarnaev flees a house at 410 Norfolk Street in Cambridge the day after it was searched by The FBI looking for explosives and other evidence.

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Audio Slide Show: War Games in America

Posted: October 14th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Audio Slideshows, Photography | | No Comments »

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American Snapshots Vol. #1

Posted: June 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Photography | Tags: , , , | No Comments »

Inspired by Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliott Erwitt, Peter Turnley and others, I decided to comb through more than 90,000 digital images that I have taken over the last 10 years to make this short book of images.

Despite taking lots of pictures over the years, I think I am just beginning to take the sorts of images I seek. I have much more hard work ahead, but I hope my best images are still out there somewhere—hidden in the back of an old western bar, around the hoopla of a rodeo, within the gates of an abandoned factory or by the pump of a lonely gas station off the interstate.

In the end, taking a good picture is a quest that you never quite finish.

I will also never forget a lesson my friend Peter Turnley learned while sipping wine at La Tartine in Paris with photographer Edouard Boubat.

“Peter,” Boubat said, “if you keep your heart and your eyes open, there is a gift waiting for you at the corner of every street.

AMERICAN SNAPSHOTS by Evan McGlinn | Make Your Own Book
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The International Photographer Index

Posted: April 1st, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Design, Photography | | No Comments »

I have been waiting for something like this for years…The International Photographer Index which I discovered by reading one of my favorite blogs, The Click. Now anyone can find just the right photographer for a project or simply peruse their growing collection of over 3,000 photographers including my good friend Peter Turnley. Best of all, if you are a photographer and have a website, you can register instantly with their service and learn about their prices.  Here is how they describe themselves…

“iPi — The International Photographer Index at photoeye.com is a visual index of important fine-art and documentary photographers from throughout the world.

It is our mission to become the most focused and useful index and search engine for discovering and exploring fine-art and documentary photography. Unlike all general search engines on the web where pertinent information is buried amidst the less relevant, the iPi search tool focuses only on the art and documentary community of photographers and their work, making it the ideal tool for a discerning audience of curators, gallery directors, publishers, editors, researchers, collectors and all other lovers of art and documentary photography.

The Photography Website Project’s mission is to index all significant websites by internationally renowned and emerging art and documentary photographers.”

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PDN: The Top 30 Young Photographers Today

Posted: March 4th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: , | No Comments »

Photo District News – the trade bible for the photo industry – has just released its annual list of the top 30 young photographers. This from the intro on their website…

“Look at the photographers in this year’s PDN’s 30 class and you’ll find a solid refutation of the idea that “everyone is a photographer now.” Did “everyone” move to Beijing to freelance for the AP with no financial guarantee like Danfung Dennis? Or live out of a mini-van so they could create a major project like Scott Conarroe? Or defy social norms to become one of the only female photojournalists from Gaza like Eman Mohammed? Is “everyone” willing to be as patient as Alex Prager, who put on her own shows when gallerists ignored her? Does “everyone” have 2,250 followers on Flickr like Ben Roberts?”

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Landscapes: No Tripod Required

Posted: February 20th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: | No Comments »

One of the most visually exciting things I have seen recently in photography were the images in this article on the Luminous Landscape by Scottish photographers Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson. Instead of capturing images using a tripod to keep the camera steady, they hand-hold the camera and shake it to create more of a painterly effect.

The picture above was one I snapped quickly in my backyard to test their technique – not great but a nice start. The effects are really wonderful and change dramatically depending on how you move the camera. The trick is to use the lowest ISO setting (50) on your camera and shut down the aperature to F22 or more in order to get slow shutter speeds in bright light.

I am planning on doing an entire series of them in the coming weeks. What a relief to be able to leave my tripod at home.

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Vimeo HD DSLR Video Contest

Posted: February 9th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | | No Comments »

The Story Beyond The Still: The Cabbie from Vincent Laforet on Vimeo.

I have been using the Canon 5D Mark II for about 6 months now and as everyone knows, it takes amazing HD video. The world really woke up to its possibilities when New York Times photographer Vincent Laforet posted his amazing HD film Reverie on his website. Now, with the help and inspiration of Laforet, the video service Vimeo has started this HD video contest called “The Story Beyond the Still” which features another HD DSLR film that he shot with the Canon 7D – a slightly less expensive ($1700 compared to $2500 for the 5D Mark II) 18 mega-pixel camera.

The way the contest works is this (from Vimeo’s website): “Canon asked photographer, Vincent Laforet, to interpret what story lives beyond this still and to tell that story with the new Canon EOS 7D. His will be the first chapter of seven, each ending with a still photograph for the next aspiring filmmaker to interpret. Posing the question to everyone, what do you see beyond the still?”

You can see the new video installments for other photographers here.

Submissions for the next chapter are due February 11.

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High Dynamic Range Trees

Posted: June 5th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | | No Comments »

tree_bw_hdr

I recently downloaded a copy of Silver Efex Pro from Nik Software and I have to say I think it is spectacular – particularly if you push the envelop with some of the filters that are available.

I have always loved the landscapes of Andrew Wyeth and have tried many times to draw and paint trees. The sad fact is, I really have no talent when it comes to drawing. One afternoon, while I was sitting at my kitchen table at my Wisconsin house on a sunny and snow-covered day, I noticed this tree that had very Wyeth-looking light falling on it. I immediately thought that perhaps I could create a high dynamic range (HDR) image with my camera and then convert it into SilverEfex Pro.

I shot 5 frames and merged them together using Photomatix Pro and then adjusted the levels and contrast in CS3 with a few dodging and burning techniques. I then applied the high contrast orange filter in Silver Efex Pro and…bam. I like the end result and think it is pretty cool for a photo that was taken during a sunny afternoon.

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