Photographing The Port of Seattle

Posted: March 23rd, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Photography, Seattle | Tags: , , , , | No Comments »

A photo taken from a bridge heading to West Seattle showing al he infastructure of cranes and shipping containers in he port of Seattle.

Seattle, WA., March 12, 2015: The Port of Seattle. Shell Oil has signed a lease which would allow it to winter-over its Arctic drilling equipment here. That is causing a lot of controversy with everyone from the mayor to an upcoming court battle. Photograph by Evan McGlinn for The New York Times.

The National desk of The New York Times called me the other day with what appeared to be a very simple assignment. They wanted me to spend the day photographing the port of Seattle for an article on Shell Oil storing their Arctic drilling gear in the port. At first blush it appeared to be a simple landscape, but once I drove around the complicated nexus of freeways, freight train tracks and overpasses it quickly occurred to me that this was going to no cakewalk.

After getting lost several times and getting stuck behind freight trains, I drove over to West Seattle and photographed from Jack Block Park and made a terrible photograph. All the infrastructure of the port was too far away. Even with a telephoto lens like the Canon 70-200 it was not a very compelling image. I then drove to Kinnear Park in the Queen Anne section of Seattle. The view of Seattle from here was stunning but the port was still too far away.

Then I got an idea. Weeks before, I had driven over to West Seattle and marveled at the view that I got of the port. Could I possibly park my car on the West Seattle Bridge? Not really. The shoulder is very narrow. But I have always loved shooting from cars so…I put my camera on ISO 640 and a shutter speed of 2500/sec and an aperture of F13 and then drove over the bridge four times holding my camera high out the passenger window as best I could in hopes that I could capture the amazing infrastructure the port. In the end, I was able to capture this image after doing some straightening in Lightroom.

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PDN: The Top 30 Young Photographers Today

Posted: March 4th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: , | No Comments »

Photo District News – the trade bible for the photo industry – has just released its annual list of the top 30 young photographers. This from the intro on their website…

“Look at the photographers in this year’s PDN’s 30 class and you’ll find a solid refutation of the idea that “everyone is a photographer now.” Did “everyone” move to Beijing to freelance for the AP with no financial guarantee like Danfung Dennis? Or live out of a mini-van so they could create a major project like Scott Conarroe? Or defy social norms to become one of the only female photojournalists from Gaza like Eman Mohammed? Is “everyone” willing to be as patient as Alex Prager, who put on her own shows when gallerists ignored her? Does “everyone” have 2,250 followers on Flickr like Ben Roberts?”

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Landscapes: No Tripod Required

Posted: February 20th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography | Tags: | No Comments »

One of the most visually exciting things I have seen recently in photography were the images in this article on the Luminous Landscape by Scottish photographers Ted Leeming and Morag Paterson. Instead of capturing images using a tripod to keep the camera steady, they hand-hold the camera and shake it to create more of a painterly effect.

The picture above was one I snapped quickly in my backyard to test their technique – not great but a nice start. The effects are really wonderful and change dramatically depending on how you move the camera. The trick is to use the lowest ISO setting (50) on your camera and shut down the aperature to F22 or more in order to get slow shutter speeds in bright light.

I am planning on doing an entire series of them in the coming weeks. What a relief to be able to leave my tripod at home.

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